TATYANA - LYRIC OPERA OF KANSAS CITY

“Soprano Raquel González excelled as Tatyana, transformed from dreamy girl (still tucked in by her nanny) to passion-enflamed women [sic] to reserved and respected lady.” The Kansas City Star

“Raquel González, soprano, is a marvel of voice and stage. As a landowner’s daughter, Tatyana, González—a native of Lawrence, Kansas—rides the emotional rollercoaster her unsuspecting character experiences with refined poise, making her climactic moments all the more enchanting. In the Letter Scene, González is nuanced in her gestures, both physical and musical. Her blossoming realization of being in love is well paced, granting the audience a chance to slowly feel the desires with her, and her facial expressions as she struggles with writer’s block are all too familiar. She sings with a  full, round sound, but a certain pointed quality at times yields to the innocence of a young Tatyana—a quality that disappears in the third act, only briefly returning as she expresses a renewed love for Onegin with great trepidation. “ kcmetropolis.org

“The stellar performance of the Kansas City Symphony under the direction Ari Pelto kept me riveted…it didn’t hurt that I was smitten by Raquel González. She was radiant in the role of Tatyana.” therestandstheglass.blogspot.com

 “Ms. Gonzalez brings real depth to the character of Tatyana, bringing her ably from girl to woman.” medium.com

 

MIMI - THE GLIMMERGLASS FESTIVAL

"The performance boasted a remarkable Mimì in Raquel González. Her complexly shaded lirico-spinto soprano proved an instrument of ideal weight for the role, and she used it to create a portrayal of extraordinary delicacy. Her seamstress never begged for our sympathies, but instead elicited them through her simple, direct manner. She treated "Donde lieta uscì" not as an occasion for grandstanding but as a plain racconto, listing the items she needed to retrieve from Rodolfo's apartment and only letting her passion come through as she sang of the "cuffietta rosa" underneath his pillow. "Sì, mi chiamano Mimì" was so unaffected, so thoroughly in the moment, that its ending elicited from the audience empathetic silence rather than applause, as if nobody wanted to break its spell. This was the work of a true artist." Opera News

"I remember seeing Raquel González sing the role of Mimi in Washington National Opera’s production a few years ago. Then she was to me “a little Puerto Rican singer from Lawrence, Kansas” with “milky translucent skin and a voice like the famed singer Mirella Freni.” Her voice, like her performance in the role, has grown even richer and more poignantly beautiful. I believe that González is the simple, working girl, awakened to love by the romantic artistic life Rodolfo and his pals represent.  She gets swept up in their carefree lives as they thumb their noses at conventions and the reality of their poverty. To her detriment, for she hasn’t their constitution, she denies the severity of her condition and thinks she will be freed of her tubercular cough by love." DC Theater Scene

"As the tragic heroine Mimi, soprano Raquel González was ideally suited to the role. She had a shimmering, youthful voice that never lost its sweet tone, even while filling the hall during her first aria “Sì, mi chiamano Mimì” when she introduces herself to Rodolfo in his grimy flat. It is important that the audience believe in Mimi as a modest young seamstress with inherent goodness or the role can come off cloying and insincere. She was such a believable Mimi, one sensed the despair Rodolfo must feel having lost her twice....González’s appearance affected a perfect Mimi." Operatoonity.com

"As Mimi, soprano Raquel González was alluring from the start and her voice only becomes more appealing and nuanced as her character’s life force diminishes." Albany Times Union

"Gonzalez's lush soprano, rich and colorful on Puccini's lyrical melodies, gives credence to Mimi's determination to prosper despite illness...Singing Mimi's farewell aria, Gonzalez generates pure emotion, which falls like a veil of sorrow upon the audience." New York Upstate

DESDEMONA - BOSTON YOUTH SYMPHONY

"Soprano Raquel González and O’Neill sang with exceptional intimacy...González and the orchestra achieved a particularly beautiful and moving moment when Desdemona bares her heart and soul to her husband...With a premonition of death, Desdemona sings the famous “Willow Song”, a lament for love gone wrong. González was affecting here, subtly drawing back her tone for each repetition of “salce” (willow)...Desdemona then kneels and prays, beginning and finishing with the “Ave Maria”. The conclusion...is one of Verdi’s finest inspirations, and this rendering could hardly have failed to moisten eyes, with González’s final floated pianissimo high A and string-playing of seraphic purity in the coda...O’Neill, González, and the orchestra made a spine-tingling dramatic and musical crescendo to the horrific killing." The Boston Music Intelligencer

FIRST LADY - THE GLIMMERGLASS FESTIVAL

"The slapstick trio of the queen's ladies-in-waiting, Raquel Gonzalez, Aleksandra Romano and Claudia Chapa, illuminate the stage with their sensual antics and dazzle with their singing." Syracuse.com

"The Three Ladies of Raquel Gonzalez, Aleksandra Romano, and Claudia Chapa were charming and lusty." Taminophile

"Raquel González, Aleksandra Romano, and Claudia Chapa were beautifully matched as the First, Second and Third Ladies, respectively. Their warm, appealing voices and excellent diction blended well yet each displayed an individual vocal and dramatic personality." Opera Today

MIMI - WASHINGTON NATIONAL OPERA

"Raquel González, a Puerto Rican singer from Lawrence, Kansas, with her milky translucent skin and a voice like the famed singer Mirella Freni...blew us away with [an] incredible combination of physical and vocal radiance."DC Theater Scene 

FIRST LADY - OPERA THEATRE OF ST. LOUIS

"...the Three Ladies in “The Magic Flute,” Raquel González, Summer Hassan, and Corrie Stallings, were so outstanding that for the first time ever, I wished their parts were longer." Washington Post

"The Three Ladies — Raquel González, Summer Hassan and Corrie Stallings — were an unmitigated delight, a zaftig trio with rich voices that blended beautifully, along with attitude to spare." St. Louis Today

TATYANA - THE JUILLIARD SCHOOL

"Raquel González's big, fresh lyrico-spinto soprano was exactly right for Tatiana; its tight vibrato was like youthful yearning itself, made into sound. She was ardent and impetuous in the Letter Scene; touching and noble as the mature heroine...she carried our sympathies from first to last." Opera News

"Raquel González sang Tatyana with a glowing soprano and brought an emotional charge to the Letter Scene and the final encounter with Onegin." Opera Magazine